Sorry I Haven’t Posted Much Lately

Sorry, but I’ve been really busy with my new site and have sort of neglected my personal blog and my barefoot blog.

In my quest to complete the AWAI online Accelerated Copywriter’s Program by the end of the year, as well as some additional training models, I’ve let my posting on this site and my barefootin’ slide for a few weeks.

For those of you that read this blog, you may remember that I have a goal to change my career path for next year.  I have always wanted to be able to respond when asked, “What do you do?” with the answer, “I’m a freelance copywriter.”

So that’s what I’ve been focusing my work on the last month or so, to the detriment of my other sites, including this one.  But this morning brought me back to it – I finished my shift (I work nights, generally from 9PM to 5AM), and during the night, had an opportunity to speak to some of the tenants and their guests about barefoot living.

To refresh your memory (and mine), I work as a “Courtesy Patrol” person – not a security guard, because as management as emphasized, we don’t ‘secure’ anything.  Basically, I Observe & Report for management of the property, a 200-unit apartment complex located in Claremont, CA near the Claremont colleges.  I walk through the complex, mostly on the street (an oval that runs around and through the apartments) and enforce the 24/7 parking by permit only rules.

If you park on our property, either as a resident or as a guest of one of the tenants, you must have a temporary parking permit or an authorized parking decal.  One gets the temp permit by calling the courtesy patrol person on the cell phone provided for that purpose.  All residents sign a form in their lease package that says they understand this rule… but it’s amazing how many people don’t read the things they sign or think the rule won’t apply to them.

Of course, after two warnings, one of 72 hours and a second and last one of 24 hours, when they have to pay the towing company $325.00 to get their vehicle back, they do become true believers.  I’ve officially been here in this job a year now, and no one has had to be reminded again once their car (or their friends’ car) has been towed.  But I digress.

After clocking in at 9:00 PM, I spoke briefly with the residents and their guests at the fireplace patio.  We have two large patio areas near the leasing office; one at the gated pool area and one by the outdoor fireplace, also near two BBQ set-ups.  After my second patrol round, I stopped and asked the tenants if they were planning to attend the October 15th “Fall Festival” meet and greet the apartment management was putting on; Taco Man catering the food, gifts and prizes for people who dress up (I know, it’s two weeks before Halloween), and candy for everyone.

When asked what costume I’d be wearing, I responded that my loincloth wouldn’t be back from the cleaners and my knife was still being sharpened at the cutlery shop, so coming as Tarzan this year was probably out.  But whatever I wore, I’d be barefoot.

This generated a couple of comments, among them, “Cool.”  and “Can I come barefoot too?”

I said of course, there’s no law against it.  And this then developed into conversations about wanting to go barefoot more often, where I’ve been barefoot, who let’s me shop barefoot and where I have to wear some kind of footwear, etc.

I explained that for the most part I tried to avoid places that would not let me shop or eat there barefoot, but for the few places I either had to go to or my wife insisted I attend with her, I kept a pair of flip-flops in the car.  I shared that Coco’s Bakery and Restaurant in Upland asked me to either get shod or leave (even though I’d eaten there barefoot a few times before).  I asked the shift manager who said this, “why?” and re responded with it’s a health code requirement.  My wife and I both – almost simultaneously – said, “No, it’s not.”  We explained there is no such provision in the health code for the entire state of California and while, it might be a company requirement, it was not a health department issue.

He back-pedaled and hemmed & hawed, but stood by his comment that I either put something on my feet or he would ask to leave the premises.  Not wanting to cause a scene, and because my wife really had her heart set on Eggs Benedict, I went out to the car and slipped on my flip-flops.  Needless to say, we will not be returning to that Coco’s for meals any time soon.

Just a couple of miles away, the Carrows Restaurant has never had a problem with my being barefoot.  The waitress one evening even called over the shift manager to check out my big toes – my wife got me a pedicure for our anniversary and I had the young lady who did my feet draw a palm tree on each big toe – they thought it was terrific and never once said or implied any disapproval of my being barefoot in their place.

I spoke with the tenants and their guests (turned out to be her sister and brother-in-law) some about barefooting, and they asked for more info.  No problem.  I provided them with three basic sites to start with:  PrimalFootAlliance dot org, Barefooters dot org, and of course, my own site, barefootchuck at wordpress dot com.  I also gave them my email address (barefootpilgrim13@gmail.com) and said if they had any other questions I might be able to answer or help with, if they did not catch me as I was making rounds throughout the night at work, to go ahead and email me.

So we’ll see each other again, and especially at the Fall Festival; although I will be barefoot, I still don’t know what I’ll be costumed as – but rest assured, with my physique, it ain’t gonna be Tarzan.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s